Introduction

  • Yale celebrates 175th anniversary of Edward E. Salisbury’s appointment as Professor of Arabic and Sanskrit languages and literature. Click here…

  • Professor Shawkat M. Toorawa joins Yale-NELC. Click here…

  • Ritual Landscape and Performance, an Interdisciplinary Conference. Click here…

  • Yale in Egypt is dedicated to the study and exploration of the civilizations, languages, and history of the Nile Valley and its desert hinterlands from prehistory to late antiquity. Click here…

  • Former and present Yale-affiliated Assyriologists at the 60th Rencontre Assyriologique Internationale, Warsaw, Poland, 2014. Click here…

  • Photo Essays by Karen Polinger Foster. Click here…

  • Alberto Urcia conducting a 3D structured-light scan of a medieval sphinx in Viterbo, Italy. The exact-size replica created with this method was displayed in the Echoes of Egypt exhibition at Yale’s Peabody Museum in 2013.

  • Eckart Frahm (left) and Enrique Jiménez (right) with Mario Monti (center), President of Bocconi University, Milan, and former Prime Minister of Italy, at West Campus during the U.N. Global Colloquium of University Presidents. Click here…

  • Yale-NELC Cuneiform Commentaries Project directed by Prof. Eckart Frahm receives award from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Click here…

  • Edward Wells, “Map of Turkey, Arabia, and Persia,” 18th century (Yale University Map Collection)

The Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations is one of the world’s leading centers for the study of the Near East.

Though the present Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations did not formally come into being until the twentieth century, the origins of the Yale Department go back to 1841, when Arabic was first offered at Yale.  Throughout its long history, the Department has maintained its strong sense of traditional humanist values, as well as its outstanding leadership role in developing and evaluating the latest techniques, perspectives, and resources for study of the Near East, from earliest times to the modern era.

The graduate and undergraduate programs of the Department of Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations emphasize reflective scholarship based on sound knowledge of the languages, civilizations, and material culture of the Near East.  The Department’s main faculty strengths today are in the areas of Arabic, Graeco-Arabic, and Islamic studies; Assyriology, including Sumerian and Akkadian; and Egyptology.  Instruction is also available in art and archaeology, Aramaic (including Syriac), Classical Ethiopic, Hebrew, Persian, modern and Ottoman Turkish, and Ugaritic. Read more…